A State of Grace

“He has pity on the weak and the needy, and saves the lives of the needy.”
Psalm 72:13

Today’s message comes to you from the couch, courtesy of a steady supply of Cold and Sinus medication, and a strong cup of coffee. The Sayler house has the Flu – I feel like there should be a “bio-hazard” warning sign on our front door. It’s really pathetic; I can’t sleep at night because of the cough and the chills, but can’t seem to muster the strength to accoppmlish anything during the day. The kids (the healthy ones, anyway) have made it to school, dressed, fed, and on time – and the dishes are done, but that’s about the extent of my abilities today.
A Doctor friend of mine put it this way, “The first day you’re afraid you’re going to die, the second day you’re afriad you won’t.” Yeah, that pretty much sums it up. I think I’ve said more than once in the midst of all this, “Come, Lord Jesus!”
Lying here, however, I realized once again how each and every sickness is a parable of the sickness of the soul. I can’t rally the strength to get off the couch today, and there is work to be done. I know what I need to do – for the family, and for work – but my body is working against me. My head feels thick and weighs about a ton, and someone keeps playing with the thermostate in here, from cold to hot every 10 minutes. I feel useless, Christi said I looked old, and there is nothing I can do to make myself better. Is that not the condition of the soul in sin?
And this is where the gospel says, “Exactly.” In 2 Corinthians 12, we are reminded that God’s grace is suffifient, for his “power is made perfect in weakness.” It is precisely when we are at our weakest, when we are unable to do anything for ourselves to bring about our own salvation, our own health, that Christ comes to us in his Grace and Mercy. “When we were still sinners, Christ died for us” (Rom 5:8). “For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God” (Eph 2:8).
Those who think they are strong think they have no need of a savior. It is those who are weak, those who cry out for help, who find it. God has great compassion on the weak. Psalm 72 teaches us, “He has pity on the weak and the needy, and saves the lives of the needy.”
So am I glad to be sick, and to come from a house of sick people? No, not really. But I can rejoice in all things, even in this, and I can give thanks! Why? Because even in this condition, no especially in this condition, I see the Good News of God’s grace. When I was utterly helpless to do anything about my own salvation, God secured for me forgiveness and everlasting life through Christ my Lord.
Grace and Peace,
SDG

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About reveds

Occupation: Pastor, Ebenezer Presbyterian Church, Lennox, SD Education: BS - Christian Education, Sterling College; MDiv. - Princeton Theological Seminary Family: Married, with Four children. Hobbies: Running (will someday run a marathon), Sci-Fi (especially Doctor Who and Sherlock), Theater, and anything else my kids will let me do.
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