Gobsmacked by God’s Glory

Let me take you through a typical day for the Sayler household.  We don’t set an alarm these days for two reasons, 1) we don’t want to wake the baby; and 2) the baby wakes us up early enough.  Usually at 6:30 sharp, Isaiah is up and ready to go for the day.  Since he shares a room with Noah, Noah is up as well.  We then spend the next 30 to 45 minutes trying rouse, dress, and feed Hannah and Caleb so that they are ready to go to school by 8:00.  I take all the kids with me to drop off the oldest two, so that Christi can then get herself ready for the day.  When I get back home, I then get ready for work, fix the Thomas the Train tracks about 10 times, and rush out the door. 

I can usually hear one song on the radio, depending on how I hit the light at Willow and 2nd, and then I get right to business.  After a day of writing, praying, reading, studying, visiting, etc… I then rush home to help corral the kids while we get dinner on the table.  After dinner its bath-time, book-time, and bedtime, so that by 8:00, hopefully all the kids are in bed and Christi and I can finally crash.

I don’t tell you this to generate sympathy, but to let you know that I, too, know what it means to rush through life.  There are days when I get to the office and I can’t even tell you what the weather is outside because I never really stopped to pay attention.  Those of you with children, or whose children have grown, you know what busy means.  Sometimes it feels as if your just existing rather than really living.

But there are moments, few and far between, when we stop and are confronted with the glory of God.  For me, it’s usually when I’m taking the trash out at night (seriously).  I take my time walking back to the house, and look up into the night sky.  The stars are screaming to me from their silent posts, “There is more to this life…”  Sometimes we’re privileged to catch a beautiful sunrise or sunset, or to take in some great view of the fertile plains of Iowa, or maybe it’s just the rare occasion to sit back and relax on a sunny afternoon.  The Psalmist reminds us, “The heavens declare the glory of God…”  It’s no accident that moments like these cause us to stop and breathe deep the splendor of God’s wondrous work.  We were meant to enjoy His creation, to revel in His beauty, and to give glory to God for all that He has done and all the He is.

Sometimes I think we need to be a little shell-shocked by God’s glory to awaken us from the everyday rat-race that we have made of this life.  If we were to spend a little more time marveling at the glory of God each day, what would it look like?  One of my favorite songs is called “Intoxicating,” by the David Crowder Band.  (I’ve posted a copy of it here, it will help if you listen in.)  In the song, they sing about what the glorious presence of God has on us:

Intoxicating You are to me
Illuminating You are to see
Truly breathtaking You are to breathe
Sending my head spinning You are, You see

And I’ve lost my mind, I’m sure to find
Need to apologize for my
Lack of inhibition, for my belligerent condition
But with You this near I’m dizzy

Inebriating You are to me
Completely captivating You are you see
Sending my world spinning You are, You see

I wonder how a radical encounter with the majesty and glory of God would transform us?  Maybe we’d go through this life with our eyes open to the glory and beauty of God all around us.  Maybe we’d become more worshipful in everything we’d do.  Maybe the world would begin to look at us and see the glory of God shining through. 

How have you seen the glory of God this week?  How has His glory transformed you?  How will you, then, live for His glory?

Grace and peace,

SDG

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About reveds

Occupation: Pastor, Ebenezer Presbyterian Church, Lennox, SD Education: BS - Christian Education, Sterling College; MDiv. - Princeton Theological Seminary Family: Married, with Four children. Hobbies: Running (will someday run a marathon), Sci-Fi (especially Doctor Who and Sherlock), Theater, and anything else my kids will let me do.
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